Category Archives: Networking

Intercultural Communication at Work


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In this globalised world, communicating in intercultural contexts is not as easy as it may seem…

Anne Egros‘s insight:

When you don’t understand someone’s behavior in intercultural context, ask questions, don’t guess through your own perception.

Be aware of your own cultural bias is a good start then listen to other people and notice similarities or differences on how messages are perceived and understood by making sure there is no misinterpretation either in words, voice tone or body language.

Good demonstration at the end of this article using Anglo-Dutch Translation Guide.

See on www.spaces.nl

 

Social Media Usage Across Cultures


Anne Egros, Global Executive Coach:

Since this post was published in 2010, the worldwide map of social media has changed dramatically.

For example in Brazil Facebook has replaced Orkut and in Russia, the number of social media users is growing at a very fast pace, mostly on their own local sites Vkontakte and Odnoklassniki.

World Map of Social Networks | Vincos Blog | Global Leaders | Scoop.it

Read more :

→World Map of Social Networks : http://sco.lt/5wsYJl

→ 4 Fascinating Facts on the Social Media Landscape in Russia http://sco.lt/5Bq5bd

-> China: 600 Million Social Media Users. China’s Web in 2013, http://sco.lt/8rPz8r

Originally posted on Anne Egros, Intercultural Executive Coach:


With the globalization we have seen an increase of usage of social media everywhere.

According to Nielsen research(January 2010), global consumers spent more than five and half hours per month on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter in December 2009, an 82% increase from the same time last year.

However there are great differences on how people use social media  in different countries. For example Brazilians are the top social media users worldwide according to anotherglobal survey byNielsen(June 2010). People in Brazil communicate mainly  in Portuguese. The social network made by Google,Orkut,has been adopted by 50% of Brazilians internet users but is not very popular in the United States.

For global marketers and people who want to develop both local and international networks,  it is important to determine  how people from different countries interact with social media.

There are five  main driving…

View original 836 more words

Beware the Very Real Effect of Negative Social Connections


See on Scoop.itEducation For The Future

There’s a growing body of evidence supporting the idea that your friends’ friends wield tremendous power over you without you even knowing it.

Social networks are the groups of real friends that we all share and interact with.

Anne Egros‘s insight:

“Birds of a feather really DO flock together”

In the article, the negative effect of social networks is shown with obese people who tend to connect with other fat people on many levels of connection.

Emotions are the tools people use to connect with social network friends usually faster than in the real world where people tend to be more inhibited to expose themselves in person.

The phone works two ways though and the positive effects of your online friends may outweigh the negative impacts.

For example you can join people who have common goals and interests such as losing weight, staying fit and healthy, aging, raising kids or living abroad etc. Social networks can sometimes help you get extra motivated and less isolated.

What do you think ?

See on networkedblogs.com

Conversation Killers : What Do You Do ? Where Do You Come From ?


FACE-CONFUSED-EXPRESSION

Picture: Huffington Post : Want To Kill A Conversation? Ask Someone What They Do

Imagine , you are at a networking event and you are new in town or never met anybody in the group before, you have butterflies in your stomach, when someone comes to you and ask :

What do you do ?  Like most people you might feel embarrassed to answer such a direct question, especially when you don’t have a “job”.

Is what someone does the most important information you need to engage a conversation anyway ?

Same apply to  ‘Where do you come from? ” If you want to avoid being stereotyped, what would you answer?

Tips: Try to answer and give information about you that encourage the other person to share their personal interests .

So here what works for me:

What Do You Do? I love living abroad, meet people from different backgrounds, explore new food, discover natural wonders, learning new stuff like languages. How about you ? What do you love to do when you are not at work?

Where Do You Come From? I am not sure if where I am from defines me anymore as I spent most of my adult life living abroad, I get inspired by my French mom for cooking dishes with a Provencal flavor like “ratatouille” but would die for having authentic “zaru soba”. I really like cosmopolitan urban style of living like I had in New York, or Tokyo and now in Moscow. How about you? What are your favorite places for vacation?

If you are like most people,  you probably have fears and anxiety to engage a conversation with people you don’t know, so:

How do you feel when you get those questions ?

In addition if you are an expat “trailing” spouse like me and freshly arrived in a  city or country you may be even more uncomfortable to answer as nobody is really interested by what you are really doing : unpacking cartons, helping children adjust to their new school or being lost in translation at the supermarket. On top, you might experience the emotional struggles of the “culture Shock”.

What are your typical answers ?

What are the most embarrassing questions you ever got at a networking event ?

Related articles:

Yes, It’s Possible To “Network” Without Being A Jerk


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Your network, as they say, is your net worth. Connections, as we know, create value

Anne Egros‘s insight:

Great tips about networking in this article published in FastCompany

Working hard and smart won’t help you develop your career without connections.

It is in fact not that hard to build and maintain a valuable network of professional and personal connections. Just follow two fundamental rules:

  1. Be Genuine.
  2. Stay in touch.

Related articles : 

See on www.fastcompany.com

Linkedin: Boosting Or Damaging Your Networking Results ?


So you have 500plus connections with people you don’t really know. Is that how you build your network

Anne Egros‘s insight:

I don’t agree with the opinion shared in this article: “5 WAYS LINKEDIN GETS IN THE WAY OF NETWORKING” about posting updates and recommendation to limit the number of people you connect with.

First Linkedin updates help you boost your presence online and build your expert reputation better than any other content marketing tools. Second, when you connect with people you don’t know but who share your interests, you increase the likelihood to meet interesting people you would never had the opportunity to meet in real life.

I think you get the most of Linkedin by using their search tools to see who are the players in your industry, specific countries or companies. With group discussions and updates from experts as well as company insights you can stay up to date with new trends and get new ideas.

Being a serial expat moving every three years, I frequently contact people I don’t know who live in my future “home”. Very often people kindly share their tips. Thanks to those preliminary online exchanges, I have a list of people to meet in person when I arrive in my new place and it is really the best way to find like-minded people and speed-up my network building process.

So, in short, LinkedIn is enhancing my networking capability and get me closer to people I need to know not only for my business but also as a content curator to build knowledge and get inspired by new ideas.

See on www.fastcompany.com

How To Make Your Résumé For Applicant-Tracking Systems


Asian Woman

“Many job seekers have long suspected their online employment applications disappear into a black hole, never to be seen again. Their fears may not be far off the mark, as more companies rely on technology to winnow out less-qualified candidates.”  This quote is from the WSJ article: “Your Résumé vs. Oblivion”  where the author explains how recruiters and hiring managers deal with your resume when you send it via email or upload it on a job board, company’s career websites or Linkedin. In the age of electronics and downsized organizations, companies are overwhelmed by the number of resumes they receive from job applicants so they will first scan your document into a database and a software will screen the resume for specific key words.

Guidelines for making electronic resumes:

Scanned resumes are first translated in ASCII format, a very simplified way of looking at alphanumeric characters without formatting such as bolding, italics and underlines. If you’re submitting a paper resume to a company and you think the resume is going to be scanned into an electronic resume, then you need to make sure the scanning process understands what you’ve written. Remember, the database is going to convert the resume into a simple ASCII format.

Tips for writing your electronic resume:

Make sure your name is the only thing that appears on the first line of the document.

  • Remove any graphics or artwork on your resume including shading, vertical and horizontal lines.
  • Bulleted items can confuse scanners, so convert them to simple hyphens or asterisks.
  • Move all text to the left margin. Tabs, tables and centered text can sometimes confuse the scanning software.
  • Restrict your use of fonts to Times New Roman, Arial or Helvetica.
  • Use only one font size, preferably between 10 and 14 points.
  • Remove all underlining, bolding and italics.
  • Use 8.5″ x 11″ paper that is white with black ink and print your resume only on one side of the paper. This will improve the contrast of your  text and help the scanner to read your resume.
  • If possible, do not fold or staple your resume. That means mailing the resume in 9″x 12″ envelope.

Please note that the above recommendations are for US standards. In many other countries, the format is metric and paper size is A4 . If you don’t know where your resume will be scanned, ask the recruiter who posted the job.

Keywords in Electronic Resumes 

If you want to make it through the screening and ranking process, then you need to make sure you have the right keywords or key phrases in the body of your electronic resume. Resume keywords are simply the nouns and adjectives that are relevant to the position to which you’re applying. That means the choosing of keywords for your resume requires a thoughtful process.

Mailing Resumes: 

When submitting a resume by email or through mail it’s advisable to send two copies.  One copy can be the simple format the human resources department can efficiently and accurately scan into the electronic resume database. The second can be the elegantly designed resume that uses bolding and italics to highlight the job titles and keywords the writer wants to emphasize.

 Conclusion: While it is important to adapt your resume format to applicant-tracking software, the single best method of getting a job remains a referral from a company employee.

Related articles:  

 

References :

  • Guidelines for Preparing Electronic Resumes by UCLA 
  • Electronic Resumes by Money-Zine

 

Avoiding Cross-Cultural Faux Pas – Career Skills From MindTools.com


See on Scoop.itGlobal Leaders

Learn some common mistakes to avoid when traveling or working in a different culture.

Quote from the article:

The Importance of Cultural Awareness

It’s not just professionals working overseas who need to learn cross-cultural business etiquette. Stop and think about how many different cultures you come into contact with at work.

Even if you work in your home country, your colleagues and suppliers could hail from other cultures. Your organization might decide to acquire or merge with an organization in a different country. And your customers, too, may be located in dozens of countries worldwide.

Considering Cultural Differences:

Consider the following questions when thinking about how a culture might differ from your own:

What values does this culture embrace? How do those values compare with those of your culture?How do people make decisions, conduct relationships, and display emotion?How does this culture treat time and scheduling?What are the social rules and boundaries surrounding gender?How does this culture display and respect power? Which authority figures are revered?How do individuals relate to their employers?How do people in this culture communicate? How direct are they in what they say and mean?

Key Points

Cross-cultural awareness is an essential skill, regardless of whether you’re working overseas, leading a cross-cultural or virtual team, or dealing with a global customer base. Learn about the culture of the country where you’re doing business to avoid cultural mistakes, and to demonstrate respect and understanding.

Research key differences in decision making, relationships, dress, food, dining, and social etiquette before working with or traveling to a different culture. Your hosts will notice your efforts, and appreciate that you took the time to learn about their culture.

Read more on www.mindtools.com

Cultural intelligence cannot be learned by simply visiting different countries for few weeks, learning languages, attend cross-cultural webinars or read books.

Cultural intelligence is acquired by being exposed directly to cross-cultural  challenges at work and everyday life, preferably with family.

 

Why I’m quitting Facebook


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Douglas Rushkoff says the social networking site used to be useful, but has lost his trust with a feature that misrepresents his “likes” without his consent

Anne Egros‘s insight:

While I agree with many of the author’s arguments against Facebook, it is still a precious tool for people like me who are expatriates and have fiends all over the world.

However it is important to realize what is going on behind the Facebook scene that is not really pretty.

I have selected from this article the problems I think are true and some are clearly unacceptable:

1-Facebook has never been merely a social platform. Rather, it exploits our social interactions the way a Tupperware party does.

2-We Facebook users have been building a treasure lode of big data that government and corporate researchers have been mining to predict and influence what we buy and for whom we vote.

3-The true end users of Facebook are the marketers and we the users are the product. And we are its workers. The countless hours that we — and the young, particularly — spend on our profiles are the unpaid labor on which Facebook justifies its stock valuation.

4-More recently, users — particularly those with larger sets of friends, followers and likes — learned that their updates were no longer reaching all of the people who had signed up to get them. Now, we are supposed to pay to “promote” our posts to our friends and, if we pay even more, to their friends.

Facebook is not the Internet. It’s just one website, and it comes with a price.

Before privacy violation get worse at Facebook,  I already advocated for quitting it without losing your friends : Read more about the recommendations on keeping the good part of FB : 

Dump Facebook, Keep Your Friends: A Step-By-Step Guide 

To be honest I did not quit my FB account yet but I have reduced significantly the time spent on it and I cancelled all my FB notifications by email. I have also reduced the number of people who can see my information by using specific groups.


Have you heard about the “Liebster Award ” ? I did not know this concept before Jenny Ebermann author of ” Mindful Leadership & Intercultural Communication” mentioned my blog.

I searched for the origins and rules and found an interesting article : http://sopphey.onimpression.com/2012/05/liebster-blog-award-origins.html

What I like is that the “Liebster Award” is not a real award. There are no judges, no special rules. No website with an official team to congratulate you and hold your hand. It’s mostly what you want it to be.

If you receive the award, you can 1) accept it and 2) pass it along. It’s that easy.

I will make my contribution too in my next post, in the meantime check what makes Jenny a “Liebster” blogger.

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