Why I’m quitting Facebook


See on Scoop.itGlobal Leaders

Douglas Rushkoff says the social networking site used to be useful, but has lost his trust with a feature that misrepresents his “likes” without his consent

Anne Egros‘s insight:

While I agree with many of the author’s arguments against Facebook, it is still a precious tool for people like me who are expatriates and have fiends all over the world.

However it is important to realize what is going on behind the Facebook scene that is not really pretty.

I have selected from this article the problems I think are true and some are clearly unacceptable:

1-Facebook has never been merely a social platform. Rather, it exploits our social interactions the way a Tupperware party does.

2-We Facebook users have been building a treasure lode of big data that government and corporate researchers have been mining to predict and influence what we buy and for whom we vote.

3-The true end users of Facebook are the marketers and we the users are the product. And we are its workers. The countless hours that we — and the young, particularly — spend on our profiles are the unpaid labor on which Facebook justifies its stock valuation.

4-More recently, users — particularly those with larger sets of friends, followers and likes — learned that their updates were no longer reaching all of the people who had signed up to get them. Now, we are supposed to pay to “promote” our posts to our friends and, if we pay even more, to their friends.

Facebook is not the Internet. It’s just one website, and it comes with a price.

Before privacy violation get worse at Facebook,  I already advocated for quitting it without losing your friends : Read more about the recommendations on keeping the good part of FB : 

Dump Facebook, Keep Your Friends: A Step-By-Step Guide 

To be honest I did not quit my FB account yet but I have reduced significantly the time spent on it and I cancelled all my FB notifications by email. I have also reduced the number of people who can see my information by using specific groups.

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7 thoughts on “Why I’m quitting Facebook

  1. Chad March 4, 2013 at 8:13 pm Reply

    Thanks for the mention. I’m still Facebook free, and you know what? It really hasn’t impacted my life in a negative way at all. My biggest concern was staying in contact with friends, and thankfully, it hasn’t been a problem. There are some people I don’t hear from anymore, and that’s fine… we really weren’t very close anyway.

    • Anne Egros, Global Executive Coach March 4, 2013 at 8:30 pm Reply

      I am glad it works for you Chad. I am still hesitating to quit totally as I still see more pros than cons but will definitively reduce my contribution. I am just back from an internet-free week and did not even post my pictures from my vacation🙂

  2. CultFit March 4, 2013 at 8:31 pm Reply

    Awesome news, something tells me you will not miss it at all.🙂

  3. […] my previous post I shared some comments about an article “Why I’m quitting Facebook” from  Douglas Rushkoff a media specialist for CNN. I found interesting to share some of […]

  4. Stewart Anderson (@SJAnderson_11) March 7, 2013 at 5:13 am Reply

    “The countless hours that we — and the young, particularly — spend on our profiles are the unpaid labor on which Facebook justifies its stock valuation.” This implies that users receive no benefits from using Facebook, which is patently untrue. People spend time on their profiles because it serves a purpose for them, just as interacting with friends and pages on the platform serves a purpose for them – all at a cost of $0.

    I’m no Facebook fanboy, but the notion that people only serve the great juggernaut that is Facebook while receiving nothing in return is absolutely ridiculous.

    • Anne Egros, Global Executive Coach March 7, 2013 at 8:58 am Reply

      HI Steward, thanks for your remark. I agree with you and that is why I still have a FB account. However, by sharing the original article from CNN, I wanted to make people realize that the data they share are used by marketers without their permission. Many users don’t know that FB is choosing for them what they see and that it is possible to get back in the driver seat by checking the “notification” tab to receive their friends updates. Regarding privacy settings, many users don’t understand how to control who sees what on their profiles. Facebook is launching a new application, “Graph Search “(see next post) and this has great implications on privacy and reputation.

  5. Anne Egros, Global Executive Coach March 7, 2013 at 7:08 pm Reply

    Many popular Facebook apps obtain sensitive information about users—and users’ friends: here some data http://sco.lt/4u6IEL

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