Category Archives: productivity

7 psychological reasons for diet failure


healthHealth

Do you keep failing to lose weight? Your mindset might be preventing successful weight loss. Find out how to change this.

Source: low-carb-support.com

This apply to any kind of change, not only for loosing weight :

We all don’t like discomfort and change is about making you uncomfortable, so embrace it rather than trying to avoid the pain.

No pain no gain: yes if you want changes that last you will have to give up some things you really enjoy but the key is to replace habits that don’t serve your goals by new habits you equally enjoy

Focus on the process rather than on the end results, nothing is happening overnight.

Check if you are mentally and physically equipped to make the changes you need. It is better to postpone starting a change project if it is not the right timing rather than trying for a couple of days or week, failing and blaming yourself for lack of will power. It will sure make your self-esteem goes down

Have Your Made New Year Resolutions ?

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Find the Coaching in Criticism


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Image from Forbes Magazine: The Best Gift Leaders Can Give: Honest Feedback

Read original article “Find the Coaching in Criticism” from by Sheila Heen and Douglas Stone HBR Magazine, March 2014

Anne Egros‘s insight:

Learnings from the article:

What makes receiving feedback so hard? The process strikes at the tension between two core human needs—the need to learn and grow, and the need to be accepted just the way you are. As a result, even a seemingly benign suggestion can leave you feeling angry, anxious, badly treated, or profoundly threatened. A hedge such as “Don’t take this personally” does nothing to soften the blow.

The skills needed to receive feedback well are distinct and learnable. They include being able to identify and manage the emotions triggered by the feedback and extract value from criticism even when it’s poorly delivered.

Six Steps to Becoming a Better Receiver

1. Know your tendencies

2. Disentangle the “what” from the “who”

3. Sort toward coaching

4. Unpack the feedback

5. Ask for just one thing

6. Engage in small experiments

After you’ve worked to solicit and understand feedback, it may still be hard to discern which bits of advice will help you and which ones won’t. We suggest designing small experiments to find out. Even though you may doubt that a suggestion will be useful, if the downside risk is small and the upside potential is large, it’s worth a try.

See on hbr.org

Related article:

The Best Gift Leaders Can Give: Honest Feedback

 

12 Reasons To Stop Multitasking


See on Scoop.itGlobal Leaders or See on www.huffingtonpost.com

By Amanda MacMillan We all do it: Texting while walking, sending emails during meetings, chatting on the phone while cooking dinner.

Anne Egros‘s insight:

The slides in the article are very good examples that should make you think about re-designing your life and your work if you feel constantly distracted and have your energy consumed by doing different things simultaneously. 

University of California, San Francisco last 2011 declares, “Researchers know that multitasking negatively impacts working memory in both young and older adults”

More than 15 years ago, Steven Covey already identified the problem and gave us a method to focus on doing most important tasks to reach our true goals in his books: THE 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE  (HABIT 3: PUT FIRST THINGS FIRST) and FIRST THINGS FIRST.

I have summarized the Covey’s books in the following article:

Getting A Balanced Life in Only Two Steps

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

What motivates us at work? 7 fascinating studies that give insights


  • The less motivated an employee is, the more money he is asking !
  • If employees are not intrinsically motivated chances are very high that they are not creative as well. and won’t work hard enough as passionate people do.
  • Being passionate is coming from the inside-out. You can break somebody’s motivation very easily but it is very hard for leaders to inspire people to give happily the best of what they have to offer if they don’t want to and don’t have trust in the management.

The Three ‘E’s of Engagement: Engage, Empower, Enable:

Engage

leaders must provide a clear view of the company’s future, connect the company values with the individual life purpose, identify individual contribution to a higher level than self . Employees who feel good about themselves and think they belong to a team get the intrinsic motivation to deliver performance.

Empower

Let people decide how to set goals, how to get the expected results. Increase their personal power in making decisions at all level of the organizations. The leaders’ role is to coach and mentor individuals and teams to remove self-limiting beliefs, provide immediate feedbacks and develop strengths while minimizing the impact of weaknesses

Enable

Provide highly personalized support and enough resources. Lead teams based on matching personal communication, behavior and management styles of each team member. Provide talent development programs.

Related articles

TED Blog

Dan-Ariely“When we think about how people work, the naïve intuition we have is that people are like rats in a maze,” says behavioral economist Dan Ariely in today’s talk, given at TEDxRiodelaPlata. “We really have this incredibly simplistic view of why people work and what the labor market looks like.”

[ted_talkteaser id=1706]When you look carefully at the way people work, he says, you find out there’s a lot more at play—and a lot more at stake—than money. In his talk, Ariely provides evidence that we are also driven by meaningful work, by others’ acknowledgement and by the amount of effort we’ve put in: the harder the task is, the prouder we are.

During the Industrial Revolution, Ariely points out, Adam Smith’s efficiency-oriented, assembly-line approach made sense. But it doesn’t work as well in today’s knowledge economy. Instead, Ariely upholds Karl Marx’s concept that we care much more about…

View original post 1,168 more words

Will You Make New Year’s Resolutions in 2013 ?


Do you make New Year resolutions in January? Are you thinking about doing something new, stopping a bad habit or be a better person?

I usually write some goals and ideas around January 3rd as I feel relaxed, but full of energy.

Most people fail to stick to their yearly goals because they are either unrealistic or they don’t have the resources or they fall into the category of things they think they should do to please others, but don’t really feel intrinsic motivation to change.

Another reason for failure is to be too impatient and try to change too many things at the same time like quitting smoking and losing weight or changing job and starting a family. That’s why most people quit their good resolutions within the first 90 days of the new year.

So should we stop doing New Year resolutions? I think YES, if we stick to the definition of a resolution: “a firm decision to do or not to do something”. If we think that way it sounds like success or failure are only the results of willpower.

However, willpower is very limited as our brain is looking for rewards and instant gratifications as a result of specific behaviors especially when we are under stress. So if we want to quit smoking for example, it doesn’t help to know that we may increase the risks of getting cancer compared to the instant relief of anxiety that smoking can provide.

Before setting any specific goals for the new year, I suggest you think about moments of your life when you felt truly happy to understand what behaviors and environments make you emotionally and physically satisfied. Then, list actions and activities that you can include in your life that will reproduce those moments. It is also important to identify situations that make you unhappy and that you want to eliminate.

Make a list of five areas of your life you want to change such as self-development, career, family, etc. Select three goals for the year and associate what rewards do you expect based on the list of what makes you truly happy.

If you have difficulties to make this exercise and identify your priorities, maybe you can talk with your partner or a coach to make sure that you plan for success and do not make new year resolutions that you won’t keep.

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How to have an efficient day in 5 simple steps ?


Resolution - better time management

I feel it becomes harder and harder everyday to stay focused and make important things done.

We may have set SMART goals, planned a careful strategy and have a to do list ready, yet we have so many temptations that keep us away from what we really want to achieve during the day that before we know it we spend hours responding to emails, or surfing the internet , got distracted by colleagues walking by our desk or text messages on our smart phones.

Here five simple steps to keep control over your day and your time:

1-Keep a “to do notebook” :  write things to do with a due date and a priority (you can use Steven Covey’s Priority Quadrant from his book ‘First Things First’ )

2-Select  things that help you reach your goals : when you have finished your day take a look at your notes in the “to do notebook” and select 3 urgent things with short dead lines and 2 important tasks (things that help you reach your long-term goals)

3-Make a list of thing to do for the next day. Spend 10 minutes maximum after you turned off your computer and other mobile devices to write what you want to accomplish, Use your calendar (for example Google Calendar can be shared on all your mobile devices or Outlook) and schedule the time it takes to have each thing done, Be realistic about time it takes  and put the harder tasks at the beginning of the day.

4-Do one thing at a time: Before turning on your computer in the morning, close your office or go to a place you know you won’t be distracted, Take a look at your  calendar and start working. Every hour stop and look at what you have accomplished, adjust your schedule if necessary to make the next hour productive.

5-Review: At the end of the day look at what you were able to accomplish and things you weren’t able to finish on time. Analyse what can be done differently to make you more efficient the next day and start over.

7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload


See on Scoop.itGlobal Leaders

Information overload is nothing new, but it is getting far worse. Here are 7 time-proven strategies to keeping your head above the information tide.

A prominent researcher writes “information overload is a problem of the times.” What’s causing that overload?

“At present in the world there are about 55,000 scientific journals publishing about 1,200,000 articles a year. Also about 60,000 books and 100,000 other research reports are issued annually . The sheer physical bulk of scientific and technical publications appearing in the United States has doubled approximately every 20 years since 1800.”

.” It’s a challenge we can’t ignore, since information has become such a central part of our personal and professional lives. And because overload leads to performance degradation, stress, and depression, it is imperative we find effective ways to cope.

What can we do to deal with the information tide? Miller in his 1962 study provides some extremely effective strategies for dealing with overload; strategies that in some cases work just as well today as they did in the 1960s. Here are Miller’s seven strategies for dealing with information overload, updated for the times:

1. Omission – The concept is simple: you can’t consume everything, so just ignore some. This is a bit dangerous since some of the omitted information might be the most critical. Imagine that the email you ignored was the one where your most important client alerts you to a new opportunity.

2. Error – Respond to information without giving due consideration. While a seemingly poor strategy, this is more common than you might think; I mean, who hasn’t reacted to an email, report, or telephone call without thinking through all the consequences because of time constraints or lack of attention?

3. Queuing – Putting information aside until there is time catch up later. An example is processing email early in the morning, before the business day begins, or reading important reports late at night.

4. Filtering – This is similar to omission except filtering employs a priority scheme for processing some information while ignoring others. Automated tools are particularly well suited to help filter information. Recommendation engines, search tools, email Inbox rule engines and Tivo are all good examples of tools that can help filter and prioritize information.

5. Employing multiple/parallel channels – Doling out information processing tasks; for example, assigning the tracking of Twitter feeds to one person and blog coverage to another person on your team.

6. Approximation – Processing information with limited precision. Skimming is an example of approximation. Like omission and error, you can process more information by approximating, but you run the risk of making critical mistakes

7. Escaping from the task – Making this someone else’s problem. While it sounds irresponsible, admitting you can’t ‘do it all’ and giving an assignment to someone else is sometimes the best strategy of all.

Over the years, self-help and management guidebooks have dedicated significant attention to queuing, employing multiple channels and approximation as ways of improving information processing. More recently, filtering has received more attention. There are now a host of digital filtering technologies to make our lives easier; some examples include search tools, RSS alerts, email filters, social media analysis tools, and web analytics. Another exciting new area for dealing with information overload are tools that prioritize information through context analysis. This is a fascinating area that is in its infancy. I will come back to that in a future post.

A final note: If you didn’t get the gist of this post, you can always skim it again or come back to it later…just don’t assign it to someone else to read.

Author David Lavenda is a high-tech product strategy and marketing executive. He also does academic research on information overload in organizations and is an international scholar for the Society for the History of Technology. He tweets from @dlavenda.

See on www.fastcompany.com

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